Keeping a Child Away From the Other Parent Can Backfire in 10 Ways

Keeping a child away from the other parent can backfire in many ways. In this post, we will discuss ten of the most common ways that this can happen. When parents keep their children away from the other parent, it often creates more problems than it solves.

As a parent, you may face some legal problems, and your child may feel angry and resentful toward both parents and may be less likely to want to spend time with either of them. This can cause tension and conflict within the family, leading to more significant legal disputes.

Keeping a Child Away From the Other Parent Can Backfire

How Keeping a Child Away From the Other Parent Can Backfire in 10 Ways


Does alienation backfire? It’s not uncommon for divorced or separated parents to try to keep their children away from the other parent. Sometimes this is done out of spite or because the parent believes it is in the child’s best interests.

However, research has shown that this strategy can often backfire in below ten ways:

#1. Violating of court orders:

Violation of a court order is a serious matter. If you have been ordered by the court to have visitation with your child, and the other parent is preventing you from doing so, this amounts to a violation of the court order.

In many cases, the non-custodial parent will be held in contempt of court and may be subject to penalties, such as fines or even jail time.

If you have difficulty enforcing your visitation rights, you should contact an attorney to help you take action against the other parent. Violating a court order is not in your child’s best interests and can have serious repercussions.

#2. May loss the child custody rights:

In the eyes of the law, both parents are equally responsible for their child’s wellbeing – even if they are no longer together. This means that, unless a court order states otherwise, both parents have the right to spend time with their child.

If one parent deliberately keeps the child away from the other parents, it is considered a form of parental alienation and can be grounds for a custody modification. The custodial parent has no right to interrupt the visitation rights of the other parents unless there is any court order to do so.

If the other parent can prove it in court and ask the court to overturn the custodial order, the custodial parent may lose custody of the child. Coping up the losing child custody was never an easy matter.

#3. Might face a criminal charge of custodial interference:

In some states, the custodial parent may face criminal charges of custodial interference for keeping the child away from the other parent.

Suppose there is a criminal charge of custodial interference under Arizona Law A.R.S. Section 13-1302, which includes punishments for a class 6 felony.

This can happen if the custodial parent moves out of state without the other parent’s permission or if the custodial parent fails to return the child after a visit.

If the custodial parent is found guilty of custodial interference, he or she may be required to pay a fine, go to jail, or lose custody of the child. In some cases, the non-custodial parent may also file a civil lawsuit against the custodial parent for damages.

Therefore, parents need to understand their rights and responsibilities regarding custody and visitation before they take any action that could result in criminal or civil penalties.

#4. The court may order to attend co-parenting classes:

If the court finds that one parent deliberately keeps the child away from the other parents, the court may order the custodial parent to participate in co-parenting classes.

These classes are designed to help parents learn how to work together for the benefit of their children. It also teaches parents how to communicate effectively, resolve conflict, and develop a good parenting plan for both parents and children.

If you are ordered to attend co-parenting classes, taking them seriously is essential and trying to learn the skills that will be taught. These skills can help you have a better relationship with the other parent and benefit your child in the long run.

#5. Curtail the rights of the child:

It is a well-established fact that children need the love and support of both parents to thrive. Unfortunately, some custodial parents attempt to curtail the other parent’s rights by keeping their child away from them.

This not only denies the child the opportunity to form a strong bond with the other parent, but it can also have a profound negative impact on their development.

Studies have shown that children denied access to one parent are more likely to suffer emotional, behavioural, and academic problems. Additionally, they are more likely to have difficulty forming relationships in adulthood.

It is therefore crucial that custodial parents allow their children to spend time with both parents, even if it means making sacrifices themselves. Only then children get the chance to reach their full potential.

#6. The child may develop psychological problems:

Children who are kept away from one parent are often left feeling confused, anxious, and angry. They may blame themselves for the breakup of their family and feel like they have to choose sides.

This can lead to behavioural problems and difficulty forming healthy relationships later in life. Additionally, children who don’t have reasonable contact with both parents are more likely to experience academic challenges and mental health issues.

If you’re divorced or separated, it’s essential to encourage a healthy relationship between your child and the other parent. This means setting aside your feelings and creating a parenting plan for your child’s best interest.

It may not be easy, but it’s important to remember that your child deserves to have a relationship with both parents.

#7. The child will feel isolated and alone:

When one parent is kept away from the child, the child will inevitably feel isolated and alone. They may feel like they don’t have anyone to turn to or are not important enough to have a relationship with both parents.

This can lead to feelings of depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem. Additionally, the child may become withdrawn and have difficulty trusting people. You already failed to stop the divorce, and now you should not make the life of your child isolated.

Make sure your child knows that he or she is loved and valued by both parents. Encourage communication between the child and the other parent, even if it’s just through text messages, phone calls, or email.

Let the child know it’s okay to talk about the other parent and have positive feelings towards him or her. Keeping the lines of communication open can help your child feel connected to both parents and avoid feelings of isolation and loneliness.

#8. The child may disrespect you:

If you withhold your child from the other parent, your child may start to view you in a negative light. They may feel you are keeping them from someone they love, leading to resentment and disobedience.

There is a risk that the child may start seeing the other parent as a role model and imitate their behavior. Using a child to hurt other parents is not good parenting and will only backfire in the long run.

#9.  You will never have peace of mind:

If you’re keeping your child away from the other parent, likely, you’ll never have peace of mind. You’ll always be worried about what the other parent is doing and whether or not they are being good to your child.

You may constantly argue with the other parent about visitation and custody arrangements.

Also, remember that keeping your child away from the other parent is not worth sacrificing your peace of mind. Providing a stable and loving home for your child will be difficult if you’re constantly stressed and anxious.

#10.  It’s not in the best interests of the child:

Ultimately, keeping a child away from the other parent is not in the child’s best interests. It can lead to a host of problems, both in the short and long term.

If you’re divorced or separated, you know why does divorce take so long and how it makes your life more complicated. Now, it will not be in the child’s best interest if you keep them away from their other parents. You should act accordingly.

You can watch the discussion of Wendy Wisdom on how parental alienation will backfire on YOU!

FAQs on Keeping a Child Away From the Other Parent Can Backfire


Can a parent stop a child from seeing the other parent?

No, a parent cannot legally stop a child from seeing the other parent unless there is a valid reason to do so, such as if the other parent is abusive or poses a danger to the child or unless there is any court order to do so.

What happens if a parent doesn’t allow the other parent to see their child?

If a parent doesn’t allow the other parent to see their child, it can lead to several problems. The child may feel isolated and alone and resent the parent who keeps them away from the other parent.

The child may start to imitate the other parent’s behavior. Ultimately, keeping a child away from the other parent is not in the child’s best interests.

Is it wrong for a parent to keep their child away?

Indeed it is wrong. Children have a right to a relationship with both of their parents. In most cases, having a solid relationship with both parents is in the child’s best interest.

Many factors can contribute to a child’s well-being, and both parents play a vital role in providing stability and support. Additionally, children benefit from having a wide range of adults in their lives who can offer love and guidance.

How do you deal with a manipulative co-parent?

It depends on the situation. If the co-parent is trying to manipulate you into doing something that is not in your child’s best interest, then you need to stand up for what is best for your child and refuse to be manipulated.

Suppose the co-parent is trying to manipulate you into doing something harmful to yourself, such as giving them more money than you can afford or taking on more debt. In that case, you must put your well-being first and protect yourself from being taken advantage of.

You can do this by communicating clearly with the co-parent about what you are and are not willing to do, setting boundaries, and seeking outside support if necessary.

How can I Stop my Child from seeing the other parent?

You cannot legally stop your child from seeing the other parent unless there is a valid reason, such as if the other parent is abusive or poses a danger to the child. If there is something serious, you can file for a restraining order.

If you have sole custody, you can decide whether or not your child sees the other parent. However, if you share joint custody with the other parent, you must agree on visitation and parenting time. If you cannot reach an agreement, you may need to go to court to resolve the issue.

Conclusion:

While keeping a child away from the other parent may seem like the best solution at this moment, it can have negative consequences for both the child and the parents. So, you shouldn’t try to do that.

About Shakir Ahmed

Head of the editorial team. I hold a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B) from UoL. Written hundreds of articles on divorce, child custody, employment and other human rights law topics for blogs and websites worldwide. Worked 6 years as a relationship development trainer. For any communication regarding any legal matter, please feel free to email me at shakir@lawyersnlaws.com

3 thoughts on “Keeping a Child Away From the Other Parent Can Backfire in 10 Ways”

  1. I have proof and documentation that parental alienation is happening to my children and I. They will not even communicate with me by no means. I just need legal help to be sure CPS does not try to steal my children.

    Reply
    • For legal help, you should contact a lawyer who specializes in family law and has experience with parental alienation cases. This type of attorney can help you understand your legal rights, ensure that your children’s best interests are being met, and combat any attempts by Child Protective Services (CPS) to take your children away from you.

      Reply

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